Oceanex Avalon (2009)   Begun during a residency in St. John’s, Newfoundland,  Oceanex Avalon enacts a ceremonial burial of industrial remnants. Using copper etching plates, I constructed a model of a cargo ship, the  Oceanex Avalon , which was then filled with etched paper models depicting the region’s once-thriving fishing industry. This ship was set into a 200L bath of weak ferric chloride etching acid and left to slowly erode throughout the duration of the exhibition - destroyed by its own means of production. As it floated for nearly a month in this chemical bath, a mist gathered, lulling one into a belief that it might avoid the inevitable sinking - which occurred shortly before the exhibition closed. This act of burial-at-sea for these lost industries memorializes what was lost, while cautioning against the unchecked speculation that comes with a second boom.     Oceanex Avalon was produced with the support of St. Michael's Printshop
       
     
  Oceanex Avalon  (week 1), copper etching plates, etching on paper, ferric chloride, plexiglas, 2010.
       
     
 Week 2
       
     
 week 3
       
     
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  Oceanex Avalon (2009)   Begun during a residency in St. John’s, Newfoundland,  Oceanex Avalon enacts a ceremonial burial of industrial remnants. Using copper etching plates, I constructed a model of a cargo ship, the  Oceanex Avalon , which was then filled with etched paper models depicting the region’s once-thriving fishing industry. This ship was set into a 200L bath of weak ferric chloride etching acid and left to slowly erode throughout the duration of the exhibition - destroyed by its own means of production. As it floated for nearly a month in this chemical bath, a mist gathered, lulling one into a belief that it might avoid the inevitable sinking - which occurred shortly before the exhibition closed. This act of burial-at-sea for these lost industries memorializes what was lost, while cautioning against the unchecked speculation that comes with a second boom.     Oceanex Avalon was produced with the support of St. Michael's Printshop
       
     

Oceanex Avalon (2009)

Begun during a residency in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Oceanex Avalonenacts a ceremonial burial of industrial remnants. Using copper etching plates, I constructed a model of a cargo ship, the Oceanex Avalon, which was then filled with etched paper models depicting the region’s once-thriving fishing industry. This ship was set into a 200L bath of weak ferric chloride etching acid and left to slowly erode throughout the duration of the exhibition - destroyed by its own means of production. As it floated for nearly a month in this chemical bath, a mist gathered, lulling one into a belief that it might avoid the inevitable sinking - which occurred shortly before the exhibition closed. This act of burial-at-sea for these lost industries memorializes what was lost, while cautioning against the unchecked speculation that comes with a second boom. 


Oceanex Avalon was produced with the support of St. Michael's Printshop

  Oceanex Avalon  (week 1), copper etching plates, etching on paper, ferric chloride, plexiglas, 2010.
       
     

Oceanex Avalon (week 1), copper etching plates, etching on paper, ferric chloride, plexiglas, 2010.

 Week 2
       
     

Week 2

 week 3
       
     

week 3

02.jpg